2012-09-28

Passion For Poetry


Onegin stanza

Also know as the Pushkin Sonnet, this verse form was created by Alexander Pushkin when he wrote Eugene Onegin, which was a novel written in verse. According to Vole Central, Onegin, in Russian is pronounced An-yay-gin with a hard 'g'.

Each stanza has 14 lines rhyming ababccddeffegg. Unlike the more traditional sonnets, it is not written in iambic pentameter, it is instead written in iambic tetrameter. This seems to give it a stronger sense of motion than conventional sonnets.

Schematic:
xxxxxxxxxxxxxa
xxxxxxxxxxxxxb
xxxxxxxxxxxxxa
xxxxxxxxxxxxxb
xxxxxxxxxxxxxc
xxxxxxxxxxxxxc
xxxxxxxxxxxxxd
xxxxxxxxxxxxxd
xxxxxxxxxxxxxe
xxxxxxxxxxxxxf
xxxxxxxxxxxxxf
xxxxxxxxxxxxxe
xxxxxxxxxxxxxg
xxxxxxxxxxxxxg

At first glance I thought this was going to be more difficult than a more time-honoured sonnet because of the somewhat odd rhyme scheme, but I actually enjoyed it and when I read it out loud it flowed quite naturally. Although I don't think I'd like to write a whole novel using this verse form. :-)


Within

Unholy trinity of thought -
depression, sorrow and regret -
cause in the mind a putrid rot
that one can never quite forget;
and even were the mind wiped clean
I cannot block the things I've seen,
they will be with me ever more
I cannot close the open door.
I wonder should I even try?
Both good and ill are part of me,
to lose them would lose things that be
and that would make my life a lie
for no one knows that deep inside
lie tears that have not ever dried.


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